The War on Alzheimer’s is being waged on several fronts. While millions of Americans are living with this cruel, memory-robbing disease, many others are faced with the challenges of caring for them and even though there’s no cure right now, the medical research community is on the verge of breakthroughs. In this 12 on 12 Digital Original, Mike Montecalvo introduces you to some of those affected by Alzheimer’s and a local doctor who’s hopeful that a cure will be found.

In This 12 on 12: The War on Alzheimer’s | Meet the Warriors | In-Depth with Dr. Salloway | Resources & Links

The War on Alzheimer’s


Meet the Warriors

Mariellen Langworthy: Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2017; study participant in a clinical drug trial; published author, mother, and grandmother

Elda Dawber: Mariellen’s wife and caregiver

Roger Messier: Caregiver for his wife, Lorraine, who had Alzheimer’s and passed away after contracting COVID-19 while in the hospital for a broken hip; Korean war veteran, father, and grandfather. We first met Roger during an Honor Flight trip in 2018.

Donna McGowan: Executive Director of the Alzheimer’s Association of Rhode Island

Steven Blais: Founder/coordinator of the Providence chapter of the November Project, a national movement to stay healthy as a way to keep minds sharp; his mother, aunt and uncle all died of Alzheimer’s; Steven underwent genetic testing for the disease, which came back inconclusive

Dr. Stephen Salloway: Director of Butler Hospital’s Memory and Aging Program; currently testing new treatments for people with Alzheimer’s


In-Depth with Dr. Stephen Salloway


Resources and Links

Alzheimer’s disease has three stages: early, middle, and late. Some of the warning signs of the early stage include:

  • Finding it hard to remember things
  • Being repetitive
  • Getting lost in familiar places
  • Losing things or putting them in odd places
  • Having trouble handling money and paying bills
  • Taking longer than normal to finish daily tasks

Alzheimer’s Prevention Registries

One of the biggest roadblocks to developing effective prevention strategies for Alzheimer’s disease is finding volunteers to participate in studies. The goal of these prevention registries is to match willing volunteers with Alzheimer’s research studies for which they may qualify. Volunteers can sign up by completing a secure and confidential questionnaire, which takes about 20 minutes. Those who join are not required to participate in any study; it simply means they’ve given permission to be contacted if it appears they may be good match for a study.

Join a local registry here:


Learn More


Credits

Reporter – Mike Montecalvo
Executive Producers – Jen Quinn, Shaun Towne
Photographers/Editors – John Villella, Nick Blair
Graphic Designer – Lisa Mandarini
Digital Content Producers – Lee Dooley
Special Thanks – James Bartone, Jess Bradley, Susan Tracy-Durant, Karen Rezendes


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